Picture of Melissa Stewart

Melissa Stewart

Author

Trained as both a scientist and journalist, Melissa Stewart is the award-winning author of more than 100 books for young readers. While gathering information for her books, Melissa has explored tropical forests in Costa Rica, gone on safari in Kenya and Tanzania, and swum with sea lions in the Galápagos Islands.

Melissa's Books

FirstPrevPage 1 of 6123456NextLast
Alligator or Crocodile?

Alligator or Crocodile?

How Do You Know?

Melissa Stewart
Alligators and crocodiles may look the same to you, but you might be surprised to learn just how different these animals are! Get a close up look at the differences between these animals with brilliant color photographs...Read More

Buying Options

ISBN: 978-0-7660-3677-2
Binding: Library Ed.
List Price: $23.60
Discount Price: $17.70

Amazing Eyes Up Close

Amazing Eyes Up Close

Melissa Stewart
Did you know that honeybees have more than two eyes? Or that a giant squid's eyes are bigger than dinner plates? AMAZING EYES UP CLOSE, in the ANIMAL BODIES UP CLOSE series, lets you learn all about how animals use their eyes to look for food and to stay safe...Read More

Buying Options

ISBN: 978-0-7660-3889-9
Binding: Library Ed.
List Price: $23.60
Discount Price: $17.70

Blue Animals

Blue Animals

Melissa Stewart
Who knew so many animals were blue?! Another title in the ALL ABOUT A RAINBOW OF ANIMALS series, BLUE ANIMALS lets new readers practice their colors with vibrant photos and simple text...Read More

Buying Options

ISBN: 978-0-7660-3999-5
Binding: Library Ed.
List Price: $23.60
Discount Price: $17.70

Butterfly or Moth?

Butterfly or Moth?

How Do You Know?

Melissa Stewart
How can you tell a butterfly from a moth? What is the difference? With colorful photographs and clear language, author Melissa Stewart shows young readers how to identify these animals using critical thinking skills...Read More

Buying Options

ISBN: 978-0-7660-3678-9
Binding: Library Ed.
List Price: $23.60
Discount Price: $17.70

Creepy, Crawly Jokes About Spiders and Other Bugs

Creepy, Crawly Jokes About Spiders and Other Bugs

Laugh and Learn About Science

Melissa Stewart
Who said science can't be funny?! Read some fascinating science facts about bugs, including butterflies, beetles, and bees. Then learn some seriously silly jokes! And the fun part? The section of the book that teaches you to write your own jokes about bugs! Get ready to laugh and learn about science...Read More

Buying Options

ISBN: 978-0-7660-3966-7
Binding: Library Ed.
List Price: $26.27
Discount Price: $19.70

Dino-Mite Jokes About Prehistoric Life

Dino-Mite Jokes About Prehistoric Life

Laugh and Learn About Science

Melissa Stewart
In DINO-MITE JOKES ABOUT PREHISTORIC LIFE learn about everything from early arthropods to dinosaurs and early humans. After reading all the silly jokes, follow author Melissa Stewart's directions to create your own jokes! Get ready to laugh and learn about science...Read More

Buying Options

ISBN: 978-0-7660-3968-1
Binding: Library Ed.
List Price: $26.27
Discount Price: $19.70

FirstPrevPage 1 of 6123456NextLast

:
$867.66 $650.70 + Add to wish list
:
$718.02 $538.50 + Add to wish list

Melissa's Latest Blog Entries

SCBWI-LA Handout: Five Kinds of Nonfiction for Kids

Background
I’ve written an article about the 5 kinds of nonfiction here:

I’ve discussed the 5 kinds of nonfiction in this video created for Colby Sharp’s vlog:


5 Kinds of Nonfiction Flashcards






Narrative vs. Expository Sample Texts
Red-Eyed Tree Frog by Joy Cowley and Nic Bishop (Scholastic, 1999)

Frog or Toad? How Do You Know? by Melissa Stewart (Enslow, 2011)


Characteristics of Expository Literature



nErDcampMI Handout: 5 Kinds of Nonfiction: Rethinking Your Book Collection

Most children’s literature enthusiasts are naturally drawn to stories and storytelling, including fiction and narrative nonfiction But up to 42 percent of elementary students prefer expository nonfiction. This session breaks down the five categories of nonfiction children’s books and provides tips for re-balancing school and classroom libraries and integrating expository nonfiction into lesson plans.

Background
I’ve written an article about the 5 kinds of nonfiction for SLJ:

I’ve discussed the 5 kinds of nonfiction in this video created for Colby Sharp’s vlog:

 
Narrative vs. Expository Sample Texts

Red-Eyed Tree Frog by Joy Cowley and Nic Bishop (Scholastic, 1999)

Frog or Toad? How Do You Know? by Melissa Stewart (Enslow, 2011)

 
Citations for Articles about Student Preference for Expository Nonfiction
Caswell, Linda J. and Nell K. Duke. “Non-Narrative as a Catalyst for Literacy Development.” Language Arts, 1998, p. 108-117.

Doiron, Ray. “Boy Books, Girl Books: Should We Re-Organize Our School Library Collections?” Teacher Librarian. 2003, p. 14-16.

Hynes, Myrna. “‘I Read for Facts’: Reading Nonfiction in a Fictional World.” Language Arts, 2000, p. 485-495.

Mohr, Kathleen A. J. “Children’s Choices for Recreational Reading: A Three-Part Investigation of Selection Preferences, Rationales, and Processes.” Journal of Literacy Research. 2006, p. 81–104.

Repanskey, Lisa L., Jeanne Schumm, and Jacqueline Johnson. “First and Fourth Grade Boys’ and Girls’ Preferences for and Perceptions about Narrative and Expository Text.” Reading Psychology (2017. P. 1–40.

 
Characteristics of the 5 Categories and Activity for Students


Using Expository Literature as Mentor Texts







 


12 x 12 Challenge Handout: The Ins and Outs of Expository Nonfiction

Background
I’ve written an article about the 5 kinds of nonfiction for SLJ:

I’ve discussed the 5 kinds of nonfiction in this video created for Colby Sharp’s vlog:

ALA Signing Schedule



5 Faves: And That’s a Wrap!

Throughout this school year, thirty-three smart, dedicated educators—classroom teachers, school librarians, public librarians, reading specialists, literacy coordinators, and more—have contributed lists of their 5 favorite expository nonfiction titles to this Monday strand of my blog. Thank you! I know how busy all of you are, and I really appreciate the time you devoted to this project.

Way back in September, I had just one goal in mind—to raise awareness of the wonderful expository nonfiction books being published today. Sure, I have my favorites, but just like anyone else, I have reading gaps, so I wanted to include a wide variety of voices.

Mission accomplished! I’ve spoken to dozens of educators who are referring to these lists as they buy new books for their collections.

But along the way, I also made five important discoveries.

First, the lists weren't as diverse as I expected. Many titles were listed over and over again. What does that mean? We need more great expository nonfiction titles to be published!

Second, in general, the books that showed up multiple times were published recently. They got a lot of love from kidlit bloggers, but not from the major review journals. I'd like us to consider what accounts for that discrepancy.

Third, the majority of titles listed were STEM-themed picture books. There are very few MG and YA expository titles being published, and there are almost no finely-crafted expository books about social studies topics. We need to change this.

Fourth, even though everyone who contributed a list is an experienced educator with an above-average knowledge of children’s literature, many had trouble distinguishing between expository and narrative titles. Imagine how challenging it must be for teachers with less knowledge and experience. This realization is one of the reasons I developed the Nonfiction Family Tree.

 
Because so many people found it valuable, I later developed these slides, which summarize the major characteristics of each category. They're great for educators as well as students.




 
Fifth, many of the lists ended up including some blended titles—books that feature roughly equal amounts of narrative and expository text. I think there are two reasons for this.
(1) We need more great expository titles to be published.
(2) I suspect that most contributors have a natural affinity for a narrative writing style (which is why they chose jobs related to books and reading). As a result, they gravitate toward books that include narrative as well as expository writing. It’s important for us to remember that there’s a growing body of research indicating that many elementary students prefer expository text. We need to make sure that book collections include the kinds of books that will make all children fall in love with reading.


While this 5 Fave strand is coming to an end, my thinking about nonfiction in general, and expository nonfiction in particular, will continue. I hope to have more helpful posts starting in September. Have a great summer!
Visit Blog

Melissa's Award Winners

Why Are Animals Blue?

2009 SOCIETY OF SCHOOL LIBRARIANS INTERNATIONAL HONOR BOOK AWARD IN SCIENCE

Why Are Animals Blue?

Why Are Animals Blue?

An NSTA-CBS OUTSTANDING SCIENCE TRADE BOOKS FOR STUDENTS K-12 1997 2010 Selection

Why Are Animals Blue?